It is NOT the lens!!

It's the DISTANCE, %&^^^##

Here we go again. If you have read my harangues about this before you can go ahead and skip this one. But again I see photographers talking about lenses and perspective and blaming the lens. Even back in 2012 I was talking about the camera adding 10 pounds to people. So, let's try this again. All lenses show the same perspective from the same camera position.

Wide angle lenses don't expand a scene and long lenses don't compress a scene. The area of a photograph taken from the same camera position with the two lenses that is common to both photographs will have the exact same perspective, which includes the look of the drawing of the face in a portrait. What short lenses do is tempt us or allow us to move in closer to the subject. What long lenses do is make us back up away from the subject to fit the subject in the frame. But that is your decision. The lens suggests things, it doesn't dictate them.

 
Don’t let the lens dictate your camera position. Find your position, then pick the lens that fills the frame appropriately.
 

Let's look at two photographs. One was taken with a 24mm lens, the other with a 105mm lens and they were cropped to match the same size. Can you tell the difference?

Yes, there are some obvious giveaways. The 24mm photo has more depth of field (you can see it in the hair) because the subject was magnified less in the 24mm original. But in general, the look of the face is the same with both lenses. How can that be??? It is because the distance between the camera and the subject didn't change. That distance is what determines the look of the face. Don't blame the lens!

Above you can see the full frame and cropped images from three different focal lengths, 24mm, 50mm, and 105mm with the camera 24-inches from the subject. The perspective is the same in all three.

 
Just because a wide angle lens tempts you or allows you to move in close doesn’t mean that you have to!
 

Below is the same series, but this time from 86-inches away. Again, the perspective is the same for all three lenses. But it is different from the set above because the DISTANCE changed, not because of the lens.

Now let's go back to the slider. This time the two photos compared below are taken with the same lens (24mm), but at two different distances (24-inches and 48-inches). Now you see a big difference in the perspective. But these are made with the same lens--how could that be? It is the DISTANCE.

I really hope that this helps clear up the question about lenses and perspective and adding ten pounds to the subject and on and on and on. 

Yes, it is not practical to make a portrait with a short lens and then have to crop in and enlarge it. But again, that isn't the fault of the lens. You picked the wrong size wrench from your toolkit.  Don't blame the lens.

Thanks!