If Life Is A Stage, I'd Like Better Lighting

Sorry if you've seen this from me a few times now. I've posted on Facebook and Tweeted about it. And now a blog post. This is for all those folks out there who hate red and blue stage lights. I don't know if it is a national thing, but lighting folks in Seattle seem to love their red gels. Maybe they last longer or are less expensive than other gels? I don't know. But they generally don't look good on people, unless there is a very specific effect you are going for (such as the Aerialistas at the Moisture Festival Burlesque shows a couple of years back that were all  red).

Yes, sometimes red works. But it is often over done

Princess Farhana

in Hollywood posted

a great blog article on stage lighting

for dancers that can apply to many different theater productions. It is a great intro and reference for those not very familiar with stage lighting and a good reminder for those who have been doing it so long that they may have forgotten a thing or two. I really like the last couple of paragraphs, which I hope she doesn't mind me quoting here...

UNIVERSALLY FLATTERING STAGE LIGHTING
If you are unsure of what sort of lighting effects to ask for, or there is a limited amount of lighting in the venue, a nice, bright stage with a mixed wash of whites, pinks and ambers is a safe bet.
It will compliment any performer’s skin tone and show the true colors of costumes, props, sets and backdrops. These colors used together will warm up and soften white lights, and make the performers on stage look life-like and animated without looking harsh. A stage lit like this will also allow the audience’s eyes to take in a performance without being distracted.

Here are some local Seattle performance photos that I hope will help show that you can use other colors than red for you production.

Even black lights (UV) can work

I'd love to hear your thoughts on lighting situations you run into in theaters you photograph in. Please add your comments below.

Thanks!