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The Interfit Line of Studio Flash Units

High quality, good customer service, reasonable prices

The Honey Badger and the Badger Unleashed

The Honey Badger and the Badger Unleashed

This blog contains affiliate links. If you purchase items directly from Interfit Photographic USA using my discount code, cornicello10, I will be compensated for the referral.

I was first introduced to the Interfit line of lighting gear at WPPI in 2017. I visited their booth to find out more about the LED panels they were distributing at the time. I was impressed with the people I met and came away from the meeting more interested in their studio strobes, which I hadn’t been very familiar with before. I kept in contact with Interfit over the next few months and signed on as one of their Creative Pros in June of 2017.

Along with the quality of their products, I was impressed that they have US-based operations in California and Georgia and that I was able to meet their staff not only at large shows like WPPI, but also at regional events. Their CEO and lead engineer both attended Glazer’s Camera PhotoFest in Seattle, for example. While I have not had a reason to contact their customer service department, I have heard a number of good stories from satisfied customers.

I started my relationship with a pair of S1 strobes. In August of 2017 Interfit released their Honey Badger line of strobes. I added those to my studio along with some of their modifiers. In early 2018 they introduced a line called Studio Essentials that included a 200Ws Value Flash head and an LED monolight. Their latest release is the Badger Unleashed battery powered strobe heads. 

Here is an overview of each of their studio strobe offerings.

FLASH HEADS

Interfit S1 battery or A/C powered strobe

Interfit S1 battery or A/C powered strobe

clean, clear, easy to use controls on the Interfit S1

clean, clear, easy to use controls on the Interfit S1

S1 - Interfit’s most powerful strobe at 500 watt-seconds. It uses S-mount accessories (as do all of their strobes). It has a built-in handle to help adjust the angle of the light on a light stand. It is battery-powered with the option of plugging it into an a/c wall socket. Controls on the back are clearly labeled and easy to use. This flash offers high speed sync (HSS) and TTL exposure control when used with their dedicated Canon, Nikon, or Sony remote triggers (the receiver is built into the strobe head). The S1 uses IGBT technology to offer very short flash durations at the lower end of the power range. The modeling lamp is a 10-watt LED, which is equivalent to around a 60-watt incandescent bulb. The low wattage helps make the battery last longer. There is a glass diffuser dome covering the flash tube and modeling lamp for protection and for even light spread inside of the light modifiers you use with the flash.


Interfit Honey Badger studio strobe

Interfit Honey Badger studio strobe

Control panel on the Honey Badger

Control panel on the Honey Badger

Honey Badger - The bright yellow strobe offers 320 watt-seconds of power and has a 60-watt daylight color balanced LED modeling lamp that is as bright as a 300-watt incandescent lamp. As it is an LED, it does not get hot, so no burnt fingers changing modifiers as you would with other strobes with incandescent modeling lamps. In addition to the standard S-mount for modifiers, the Honey Badger also accepts pop-up modifiers and comes standard with a 24-inch square softbox. This strobe is all manual and has a very fast recycle time. It is compatible with the dedicated remotes and the generic remote that works with just about any camera with a hot shoe. Controls are clearly marked and easy to use. A radio trigger receiver is built in. There is a glass diffuser dome covering the flash tube and modeling lamp for protection and for even light spread inside of the light modifiers you use with the flash. The Honey Badger is my go-to light for most studio situations.


Interfit Badger Unleashed battery powered studio and location strobe

Interfit Badger Unleashed battery powered studio and location strobe

Control panel on the Badger Unleashed

Control panel on the Badger Unleashed

Badger Unleashed - This is the new cousin of the Honey Badger, though it is also a mini-S1. It is 250 watt-seconds (which is only one stop less than the S1, or power level 9 out of 10) with a 15-watt LED modeling lamp. Like the Honey Badger, it offers S-Mount and pop-up modifier compatibility. The Badger Unleashed is IGBT controlled and offers high speed sync (HSS) and TTL automatic exposure control with the dedicated remotes for Canon, Nikon, and Sony. It also works in manual mode with the generic remote trigger. The Badger Unleashed has a short flash duration to help freeze motion and recycle time is 1.5 seconds at full power. This light can power down to 1 watt-second for those times you want to work wide open with your fast lenses or just need a little kiss of light to augment your scene. The battery is rated for over 400 full power flashes per charge and recharge time is around 90 minutes. Extra batteries are available, too. There is a glass diffuser dome covering the flash tube and modeling lamp for protection and for even light spread inside of the light modifiers you use with the flash.

The new battery-powered Badger Unleashed from Interfit Photographic is now available. I took one out for its first spin this evening. Check it out here.

Interfit Studio Essentials Value Flash

Interfit Studio Essentials Value Flash

Control panel on the back of the Studio Essentials Value Flash

Control panel on the back of the Studio Essentials Value Flash

Studio Essentials Value Flash - This is a compact and light weight “starter” flash with 200 watt-seconds of power. It has a built-in radio receiver that works with the $20 remote trigger. There are kits available, including the $300 two-light softbox kit which I use to light the Egg Chair as part of my Chair Series photos. This includes 2 strobe heads, two 20x28-inch softboxes, two light stands, a remote trigger, and a carrying case. A similar two-light kit with umbrellas (but no carry case) is only $200. These lights use a 75-watt incandescent modeling lamp and there is a built-in handle to help adjust angles. Operation is all manual with an easy to use control panel on the back of the strobe heads. Recycle time is 2 seconds at full power. Power can be dialed back 5 stops to 12.5 watt-seconds in 1/10th stop increments. Modifiers attach via the built-in S-mount. A very good value for $99.99!


Accessories

The new Nomad portable battery pack is a sine wave inverter with two A/C outlets and a USB charger port. Additional batteries are also available for the Badger Unleashed and S1 lights.

Interfit-nomad-1.jpg
Interfit-nomad-2

MODIFIERS

Another thing that endeared me to Interfit is their collection of high quality and reasonably priced light modifiers, most of which come with a fabric grid included. Here is a list of the modifiers I use regularly. Scroll down for some example photographs.


Example Photographs

Interfit Badger Unleashed with Deep Zoom reflector and 10-degree grid

Interfit Badger Unleashed with Deep Zoom reflector and 10-degree grid

Interfit Badger Unleashed with Deep Zoom reflector and diffusion sock

Interfit Badger Unleashed with Deep Zoom reflector and diffusion sock

Interfit Badger Unleashed with 12x36-inch strip box

Interfit Badger Unleashed with 12x36-inch strip box

Interfit Honey Badger with 48-inch deep parabolic softbox

Interfit Honey Badger with 48-inch deep parabolic softbox

Interfit S1 with 28-inch folding beauty dish

Interfit S1 with 28-inch folding beauty dish

Honey Badger with 24x36-inch softbox

Honey Badger with 24x36-inch softbox

Interfit Studio Essentials Value Flash (two) with 20x28-inch softbox

Interfit Studio Essentials Value Flash (two) with 20x28-inch softbox

Interfit Honey Badger with 65-inch silver parabolic umbrella and diffusion sock

Interfit Honey Badger with 65-inch silver parabolic umbrella and diffusion sock

Badger Unleashed with 7-inch dish reflector

Badger Unleashed with 7-inch dish reflector

Interfit Studio Essentials Value Flash (two) with 20x28-inch softbox

Interfit Studio Essentials Value Flash (two) with 20x28-inch softbox

Honey Badger with 24-inch pop-up softbox

Honey Badger with 24-inch pop-up softbox

Honey Badger with 24-inch pop-up softbox

Honey Badger with 24-inch pop-up softbox

Interfit Badger Unleashed (two) with 36x48-inch softbox from camera left and 12x36-inch strip box at camera position for fill

Interfit Badger Unleashed (two) with 36x48-inch softbox from camera left and 12x36-inch strip box at camera position for fill

Honey Badger with 36x48-inch softbox as the background

Honey Badger with 36x48-inch softbox as the background

There you have it! Since getting into the Interfit line of studio lighting I have been able to retire my Dyna-lite, Speedotron, and Einstein flashes. Let me know if you might be interested in purchasing a Speedotron Force 5 monolight or Speedotron 202VF heads locally in Seattle.

Remember that you can get a 10% discount on any products purchased directly from Interfit USA using the code “cornicello10” at checkout.

Thanks!
John Cornicello











High Speed Sync vs Neutral Density Filters

HSS vs Neutral Density

I was reading online forums again (yeah, I know...)... I saw a discussion where a photographer was trying to figure out exposure settings for outdoor flash vs ambient light using neutral density filters. He was adamant that he did NOT want to use high speed sync (HSS) because HSS robs the flash of a lot of its power.

This got me thinking... Doesn't using ND filters also rob the flash of power? If you put a 6-stop ND filter over the lens you are effectively lowering the power of the flash 6 stops and also lowering the amount of ambient light 6 stops. If you use high speed sync to raise the shutter speed by six stops you lower the ambient light 6 stops. You also lose power in the flash, about the same 6 stops. Seems pretty much equivalent.


NOTE: Some of the links in this post are affiliate links and I might be compensated if you purchase equipment using the links. But you will also get a discount by using the link or the code CORNICELLO10 on the Interfit Photographic web site. Win/Win situation!


Testing:
So, time to do some testing. Camera is a Canon 5D mkIII with an 85mm f/1.8 lens. All of the photos were made with the white balance set to Daylight. Flash is an Interfit Photographic S1 with high speed sync capabilities modified with a 24-inch collapsible beauty dish. Ambient light meter reading was 1/125 at f/9 and the flash was a bit brighter (f/13). I wanted to make the photographs at f/1.8. 

I needed about 5 and 2/3 stops of neutral density. I had two 0.9 (3-stop) neutral density filters handy, so I stacked them on top of each other and made the first series of photos below with normal sync. Then I removed the filters and switched the Interfit S1 to high speed sync mode and made a similar set of images above the normal sync speed of the camera. The third set as the Interfit S1 in HSS mode plus TTL metering. All the photos were imported into Adobe Lightroom Classic with no adjustments made to them and then I made the following groups via the Print module. The power level on the strobe was not changed between shots in the first two sets of photos. In the third set the strobe was in TTL mode, so it did vary the power (raising it as the shutter speed increased) to maintain the proper exposure.

While this test isn't super scientific, the things I notice are a definite color cast in the photos made with the ND filter, the ND photos do not appear to be quite as sharp as the HSS photos (a complaint I often hear about variable density ND filters, but these were two single density filters), and the ND filters I used required me to take off the lens shade (something I rarely if ever do) to attach them. The ND filters make it more difficult to see through the viewfinder (6 stops more difficult, I don't want to do the math to figure out how many times darker that is). I could/should have bumped the flash power up a third of a stop or so because of the extra density. The background would have remained the same with the subject being a little bit brighter. But it is what it is. All in all a bit of a pain to work with, but it gets the job done if you have a strobe unit that doesn't do HSS.

In the middle set, using the flash in manual exposure mode with high speed sync. Again, I should have/could have bumped up the power of the flash as I went above 1/3200 sec. on the shutter speed. But the last three are still OK and salvageable. 

The set with the S1 in high speed sync mode and TTL exposure seems to be the winner to me. I was able to adjust the shutter speed to make the trees in the background lighter and darker while at the same time keeping the exposure on the subject pretty consistent. I did not make any adjustments on the flash.

Until fairly recently, I hadn't used HSS or TTL all that much with my flashes. I've been a pretty strict manual mode and in the studio type of photographer. Working with the Interfit S1 strobes has changed my mind about this. What are your thoughts about using neutral density filters to balance flash and daylight versus using high speed sync? 

For those interested in how to figure out the exposure using ND filters, here is how I do it.

  • Take a normal meter reading at 1/125 sec. shutter speed (this gives me leeway to raise the shutter speed slightly to darken the background without going over the sync speed of the camera)
  • Example: ISO 100, 1/125 Sec. at f/11
  • Adjust the output of your flash to read the same f/stop (f/11 in this case) or a bit higher WITHOUT THE ND FILTER (I went for f/13 above)
  • Decide on the aperture you want to use for depth of field. In this case I wanted f/1.8
  • Figure that from f/13 to f/1.8 is 5 and 2/3 stops
  • Find a 5 and 2/3 stop neutral density filter or adjust your aperture to match the ND filter(s) you have. If you have a 3 stop filter you can go from f/11 to f/4, with a 4 stop filter you can go to f/2.8, with a 6 stop filter you can go to f/1.4 (I opted for stacking two 3 stop filters above)
  • Take the photo with the ND filter(s) in place
  • Adjust the shutter speed up/down to darken or lighten the background
  • Adjust the power of the flash up/down to get the proper exposure on the subject
  • Deal with focus and color issues

To figure out the exposure with high speed sync

  • Decide on the aperture you want to use
  • Set the camera to that aperture
  • Make sure your flash is in HSS mode
  • Adjust your shutter speed up/down to darken or lighten the background to how you want it to look
  • Adjust the power of the flash to give proper exposure on the subject or use TTL if available

Do note that HSS on speed lights will run through batteries quicker. The folks at Interfit, though, tell me that the S1 battery actually lasts longer in HSS mode. HSS may also shorten the life of the flash tube. But everything is a tradeoff in photography.