portraits

Portrait and lighting "rules"

Rules are meant to be broken

Many photographers and educators, myself included, present some “rules” that we follow. Today I want to write about two of them. One is about lighting and that short lighting patterns are often more flattering than a broad pattern and one about posing, that the nose should not break the cheek line.

First, a quick description of short and broad lighting patterns. With the subject’s face turned slightly to the side and with the light coming from the side the light can be placed so that it lights the narrower (short) side of the face or it can light the wider (broad)side of the face. The short side is the side where the ear is hidden and the broad side is where the ear is shown. With the subject facing to the right and the light coming from the right the short side of the face is lit and the broad side is in shadow. If the light was coming from the left the broad side would be fully lit and the short side would be in shadow.

Broad light (on the left) and short light (on the right)

Broad light (on the left) and short light (on the right)

Most photographers, including myself, tend to prefer short light for its depth and its slimming of the subject’s face. However, on a recent visit to Edinburgh, Scotland, I visited a few of their great museums, including the National Portrait Gallery and the National Art Gallery. And there I noticed that a great majority of the classical paintings were done with a broad lighting pattern. My guesstimate would be 90% broad lit, 7% flat lit (the light coming from directly in front of the subject), and only 3% short lit.

William Drummond by an unknown artist in the Portrait Gallery

William Drummond by an unknown artist in the Portrait Gallery

Elizabeth Murray by Benedetto Gennari in the Portrait Gallery

Elizabeth Murray by Benedetto Gennari in the Portrait Gallery

Rembrandt self portrait in the National Gallery

Rembrandt self portrait in the National Gallery

James Balfour by an unknown artist in the Portrait Gallery

James Balfour by an unknown artist in the Portrait Gallery

Robert Kerr by Jan Lievens

Robert Kerr by Jan Lievens

One of the closest images I could find to be short lit is this Lievens painting of Robert Kerr, but it is close to being flat lit. Is “short” lighting a modern development? Is it something that photographers think of, but not of much interest to painters? It was quite interesting to wander through the galleries in each museum and take note of all the broad lit portraits. So much for that “rule” that short lighting is most preferred.


Should the nose be allowed to break the cheek line?

Archibald Hamilton by Gavin Skirving in the Portrait Gallery

Archibald Hamilton by Gavin Skirving in the Portrait Gallery

Another “rule” I usually go by is to not let the subject’s nose break the cheek line. This one held up very well in the museum galleries. I could only find one portrait that broke this rule. That was this painting of Gavin Hamilton by Archibald Skirving, which is almost a profile image, though for a profile I tend to go by the rule of not letting the far side eye show in the image. Notice that in all of the other portraits above the subject’s nose is contained within the outline of their cheek. The reason for this is that when the nose breaks through the cheek line it tends to look larger than when it is contained.

Luckily there was a sculpture nearby that I was able to photograph from a couple of angles to help illustrate this. In the first example (sorry, I neglected to record the names of the subject or sculptor) I have framed the bust similarly to Skirvings positioning of Hamilton. In the next example I moved to the left a little bit to bring the nose back within the cheek line. You can see how less pronounced the size of the nose is by making this small change in camera or subject position.

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This “rule” is broken very often in modern portraiture, especially in “lifestyle” and candid photos. But it is still one rule that I try to keep following. Speaking of making the nose size less noticeable, another “trick” is to move back away from your subject. This will make the nose relatively closer to the eyes and cheeks than to the camera, thereby compressing the perspective. This also means the subject is smaller in the frame, so most times you would then switch to a longer lens to fill the frame. But recognize that the longer lens didn’t compress the scene, the physical act of moving back did that. The lens just changed the field of view, filling the frame with the more compressed image.

Another thing to look out for is a nose that is bent to one side or the other. In that case position the subject so that the bend in the nose points towards the camera so the tip of the nose is visible and not pointed away from you.

Do you have any rules that you try to stick with? Let me know in the comments.




Thanks!
John





Holiday Celebration at creativeLIVE

Tis the season!

Yesterday, creativeLIVE held their holiday party and I convinced them to let me set up a space to do headshots of the guests. Some people think this is work, but for me it is my relaxation and my way to get to interact with all of the guests. Here are a few of the images, along with a photo of the setup of the "photo booth" at the end. All of the photos can be seen on Facebook.

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The setup, shown above, was 2 strip banks above/below the subject and one hair light behind. The strip banks were set at 400ws for the top and 200ws for the lower light. The hairlight was at 100ws with a 40-degree grid. All Speedotron heads powered by a Speedotron 805 power pack. Camera was a Canon 5D mkIII with a 24-105 lens.

Let me know if you need a photo booth at an upcoming event. We can do corporate events, weddings, parties, etc.

Thanks!
John & Kim

creativeLIVE Holiday Sweaters

I had the distinct pleasure today to photograph some of the creations that came out of creativeLIVE's Ugly Holiday Sweater class presented by Celeste Olds and Michael Alm. Don't worry if you missed it, you can re-watch for free online once the videos have been processed and uploaded..

A sampling of the "Ugly Holiday Sweaters" from today's creativeLIVE classroom. Yes, that is an iPad on Adam's chest.

A sampling of the "Ugly Holiday Sweaters" from today's creativeLIVE classroom. Yes, that is an iPad on Adam's chest.

This bring to a close another great year being involved with the folks at creativeLIVE. I started the year off with my class about working in a home studio (which is currently on sale until the end of the year). The rest of the year was filled in by assisting some amazing instructors, such as Christa Meola, Bambi Cantrell, Don Gianatti, Mark Wallace, Lindsay Adler, Rob Adams and Vanessa Joy, Vicki Taufer, Joe Buissink, Lee Varis, Ben Willmore, Matthew Jordan Smith, Lara Jade, Sal Cincotta, Lori Nordstrom, and Jared Platt.

Looking forward to see what next year brings at creativeLIVE and in my newest venture, Celebrate You! portraits. Maybe I'll see you through my lens soon. I sure hope so!

Happy Holidays to all!

John Cornicello

One main light...

This past weekend I did a "marathon" photo session with eight models, one main light, a backdrop, and sometimes an accent light.

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The one light was a Speedotron 202 head powered by a Speedo 805 pack placed in a Westcott Apollo Orb with a grid on it. The fill was a 4x6 foot white reflector. The backgrounds were Westcott's new X-drop background system. The dark one is called Eminence and the lighter one is called Saffron. In the bottom two images on Saffron I added another light on the background which was a speedlight aimed through a gobo which consisted of a piece of corrugated cardboard with three slits cut in it to break up the light from the flash. You can see the subtle effect of "light rays" on the background in those two images. The camera was the Canon 5D MkIII with the 24-105mm F/4L lens.

I really appreciated the quick setup of the X-drop frame and being able to quickly change out the fabric backdrops. For this session I had the two backdrops and simply hooked one onto the frame over the other instead of removing and replacing. This helped go back and forth quickly as different models came onto the set.

My only small issue with the X-drop is that it has to be set up a few feet in front of the wall to make room for the frame. This can be a little limiting in a small room. For this session I lucked out that there was a closet behind the backdrop so I was able to put the rear leg of the frame into the closet and push everything back to give is a little more room. For situations like that, though, the fabrics do have a rod pocket, so could be hung on a standard background support. But that does add weight to a traveling kit.

In case you were wondering, yes, the red dress in the upper right is made of balloons and was put together by Jami Krause.

Here's looking towards the holiday season and more fun themed photo sessions.

Thanks for watching!
John Cornicello